Encircled

Growing up, in a family not designed to structure potential, my earliest years were ones of insecurities, self preservation and a desperate drive to just survive. This is not an uncommon theme, sadly. And now, while it doesn’t even matter at this current stage of life – I’ve seen others with the same root stock – they tend not to grow or simply wilt on the vine without knowing passion, or what life is really about.

Bittersweet fates sent me the wonderful man I married in my early 20’s and we, together, are building a life (sweetness!). A life that includes two beautiful sons, the eldest diagnosed early on the Autism Spectrum (the little bitter). Without adequate time for my early childhood wounds to knit close, my husband and I stood facing the longest haul possible – supporting our Autistic son through his earliest years, and ultimately, the end of his life. While some people with smaller minds and hearts might find this too arduous a task, we believe this is what carves our character, gives meaning to our days and fulfills the very definition of why we are put in this world and given the gift of two exceptional children.

In the years when our oldest was being diagnosed, it was not as common a situation as today. We had to look up the definition of Autism. We had to mourn. We had to get furious that this happened to our beautiful, beloved son. We had to breathe. We had to believe. We did all that and are still doing more and more.

The toughest moments were early conversations with family – and the disconnect between belief systems. No one can describe the closeness of an Autism family acting together as a team to recover their child (body and mind) from the edge of the abyss – unless your in the same vein. Transcending the early cheerleader role, trying to persuade the obtuse, I’ve laid down my sword. Cutting the cord with the doubters, closed minded and the naysayers, we move along.

Now in my middle years, looking behind me, that suit I used to wear doesn’t fit anymore. The one that was spun at the hand of others weaving tapestry of weakness, insecurity and anxiety. We, our little tight-knit family, are not afraid anymore. We don’t really have an opinion about anyone else’s that doesn’t support our mind-set, to celebrate small successes every day.

No, I won’t pray to St. Rita – knowing Autism has healed me. Autism has grown me. Autism has given me a reason to give all I have to my children. Autism is what motivates, and knowing Autism has made me who I am.

I am an Autism Mother. ~ Wendy Frye

“It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.” ~ e.e. Cummings

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